March 24, 2021

10:00-12:00 | Opening Plenary & Keynote

Welcome

Cindy Adams Dunn | Secretary, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Award Presentation | Local Government Conservation Leadership Award, Bushkill Township

Keynote Address

Nature is Medicine

Dr. Michael Suk | Chief Physician Officer, Geisinger Health System

Dr. Suk will focus on a review of the science behind the importance of nature to individual health, and outline successful strategies of increasing engagement with nature, and ways to promote environmental stewardship.

1:00-2:00 | Stewardship and Community Conservation of Urban Open Spaces

Urban open spaces can take many forms: a small sitting garden the size of a row house lot woven into the fabric of a dense neighborhood, a half-acre community garden abundant with fresh vegetables, or a hundred acre preserve. These spaces provide numerous environmental, economic, social and health benefits within Pennsylvania’s densest population centers. While there is growing recognition of the importance of urban open space access and ecological restoration from an environmental and social justice standpoint, these properties present a unique set of management challenges. This session will present the stewardship and community engagement models of three organizations working throughout Philadelphia to conserve urban open spaces. Jenny Greenberg will present Neighborhood Gardens Trust’s (NGT) model of preserving community gardens and other shared open spaces, Julie Slavet will share Tookany/Tacony-Frankford (TTF) Watershed Partnership’s work collaborating with their communities to improve the watershed through education, stewardship, restoration, and advocacy, and Sang Phouansouvanh will highlight the Greening Coatesville Initiative effort of building local capacity to maintain a park system that matches the needs of residents.

Presenters

Jenny Greenberg | Executive Director, Neighborhood Gardens Trust

Jenny Greenberg serves as the Executive Director of the Neighborhood Gardens Trust (NGT), whose mission is to acquire and preserve community gardens and shared open spaces to enhance quality of life in Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. NGT owns or leases 49 gardens across Philadelphia and is currently working to expand its land preservation work to secure 60 gardens by 2022. Previously, Jenny developed funding strategies and grant proposals for major waterfront public access projects spearheaded by the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation. She secured over $9 million for the implementation of waterfront parks, trail, and creative placemaking projects on Philadelphia’s Central Delaware River Waterfront. Jenny also worked in Camden, New Jersey with Cooper’s Ferry Partnership from 2001-2010, partnering with community-based organizations to develop and implement neighborhood plans to guide the equitable and sustainable redevelopment of hundreds of acres of formerly industrial, vacant and contaminated waterfront land.

Julie Slavet | Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership

Julie has 40 years of experience in building organizations and serving communities. She came to Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership in 2011, after serving as the senior district staff member for Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz, leading constituent services and outreach efforts in a district of 650,000 people in Montgomery County and Northeast Philadelphia. Julie has worked at city and state levels of government and for a range of non-profit organizations. She earned a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Smith College and an M.S. in Public Affairs from the University of Massachusetts. A founder of Indivisible PHL, she has served as leadership for the Jenkintown Community Alliance, Montgomery County Democratic Women’s Leadership Initiative, Hiway Theatre, and Jenkintown Library. She is a Democratic Committeeperson in Philadelphia’s Fifth Ward and serves on the Board of Directors of the Fund for the Fairmount Water Works. Julie has grown to love Philadelphia, and doesn’t miss Boston as much as she once did.

Sang Phouansouvanh | Natural Lands

Sang Phouansouvanh serves as Director of Community Engagement with Natural Lands. In 2016, Natural Lands launched the Greening Coatesville Initiative to improve access to outdoor spaces, encourage healthy activity, and build community. Sang works to connect communities to parks and open spaces in cities in the greater Philadelphia region for all to enjoy. Sang has managed multifaceted programs in non-profits and institutions throughout diverse urban communities and coordinated an inclusive park and neighborhood improvement project in Philadelphia prior to joining Natural Lands. Sang holds a Master’s of Science in Social Work from Columbia University concentrating in non- profit management.

1:00-2:15 | Pennsylvania's New Outdoor Recreation Plan - What Does it Mean for Land Trusts

Pennsylvania has released its new 2020-2024 statewide outdoor recreation plan (SCORP), Recreation for All. The plan’s vision is that “enjoyable outdoor recreation is welcoming to all and accessible in every Pennsylvania community.” Attendees will get an overview of the plan and how it can help you pursue funding for recreation and conservation projects in your community. Participants will also benefit from live demos of the new “outdoor recreation access and need” and ParkServe webmaps, both of which can help identify high-priority areas for new parks, trails, and water access. Both the outdoor recreation plan and the recreation access webmaps are key components of DCNR’s 2021 Community Conservation Partnerships Program (C2P2) grant application. Applicants must identify how their proposed project will further specific actions within the outdoor recreation plan. The more familiar land trust staff are with the plan, the better positioned they will be to write successful grant applications. Another application question asks respondents to indicate if their project falls in a high-need area for new outdoor recreation, or if it serves traditionally underserved audiences. The recreation access webmaps are crucial to answering these questions. Although the webmaps are designed to be intuitive, live training on them will help land trust staff navigate them more quickly and avoid common pitfalls.

Presenters

Diane Kripas | Division Chief, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Diane serves as the Division Chief of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Conservation Partnerships Division. She leads a division dedicated to fostering partnerships between nonpublic and public agencies to encourage the protection of Pennsylvania’s outstanding natural resources, developing a network of greenways and trails, and expanding community recreation opportunities.

Josh Van Brakle | Recreation and Conservation Advisor 2, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Josh VanBrakle is a recreation and conservation advisor at the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. He manages communications for the Bureau of Recreation and Conservation including the development of e-newsletters, social media posts, infographics, and videos. Josh previously served as GIS specialist at the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association (now WeConservePA). He also worked as a research forester in the New York City Watershed, where he edited the landowner outreach website MyWoodlot.com.

1:00-2:15 | Progressive Access for Trails and Programs

Most of the work undertaken to date to improve access to parks and preserves for people with disabilities has focused on assuring that the design of trails and related infrastructure is aligned with federal guidelines derived from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While these efforts have been invaluable in helping reconnect populations with more significant levels of physical disability and sensory impairments to nature, there is a growing awareness that a much larger population facing other barriers faces significant challenges accessing the outdoors. This population ranges from people with developmental disabilities and related conditions like Autism Spectrum Disorder, to those recovering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and to those struggling simply to overcome the normal effects of aging. Helping these populations requires that we consider more than just the physical characteristics of trails. We have to also begin to understand the challenges faced by different kinds of users, groups they belong to, their communities and the kinds of programs and partnerships we must create with schools, hospitals, and other community-based organizations to help people take full advantage of the trail systems which we create.

Presenters

Larry Knutson | President, Penn Trails LLC

Larry Knutson is President and owner of Penn Trails LLC. Penn Trails specializes in the planning, design and construction of sustainable, natural surface hiking, equestrian and universal access trails and shared use pathways. Penn Trails is a member of the Professional Trail Builders Association. Larry is coauthor of the 2014 Universal Access Trails: Design, Management, Ethical, and Legal Considerations, published by PALTA and the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation & Natural Resources. In addition to managing trail projects in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, Knutson also teaches a variety of trail classes and workshops for PA Land Trust, PA Recreational & Parks Society, PA Parks & Forests Foundation, Penn State, the US Forest Service, counties and municipalities. He served two 3 year terms on PA DCNR’s State Trails Advisory Board. Larry is the recipient of the American Hiking Society’s 2003 Volunteer of the Year award for his trail work in Pennsylvania, he is a former Appalachian Trail overseer and Pennsylvania DCNR Park Ranger.

Peter Doehring, PhD | ASD Roadmaps

A psychologist specializing in the education and treatment of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD), Peter has led school-, hospital-, and university-based programs in the USA and Canada. His interest in those whose levels of disability would have previously resulted in institutionalization took on greater urgency when his daughter Margot was born with I/DD. Peter presents internationally on ASD, and publishes books on research-based practices, programs, and policies on ASD. He partners with local schools and agencies to create new opportunities for young adults with I/DD to be full members of their communities. He has served as Board Chair for the Land Conservancy for Southern Chester County, outside of Kennett Square that has protected over 1500 acres in the region. He serves on the Council on Disabilities for the Land Trust Alliance.

1:00-2:30 | Diversifying Your Board, Planning for the Future

The buzz in the conservation community is that organizations and their Boards should look like the communities they serve. What does that mean for your land trust? Are you getting there? What’s working and what’s not working? What’s getting in the way? In this workshop, we will examine strategies for recruiting and accommodating diversity on several different continuums, including, but not necessarily limited to racial diversity. We’ll challenge several misconceptions we regularly encounter and talk openly about barriers to success. And we’ll inevitably talk about cultural change and the ways many organizations get it wrong.

Presenter

David Allen | Principal, Development for Conservation

Development for Conservation assists conservation organizations raising money from individual donors by improving renewal, cultivation, and major gift systems. David Allen brings more than 30 years experience to the practice, including thirteen with The Nature Conservancy. He has devoted his professional career to helping conservation organizations and land trusts pursue excellence in all aspects of their conservation endeavors. David is a skilled seminar presenter, particularly in major gift fundraising. Specialties include development audits, board training, and campaigns. Working in collaboration with Consultant Nancy Moore, David also works on Strategic Planning, Organizational Needs Assessments, and Board Governance Training. Like his work in development consulting, David and Nancy work almost exclusively in the conservation space.

1:00-2:30 | The Model Grant of Conservation Easement: How it Works, and Can Work for You - Part 1

Join Pat Pregmon and Lauren Pregmon-Tetreault of Pregmon Law Offices for this 2-part workshop breaking down the Model Grant of Conservation Easement and Declaration of Covenants. A comprehensive look at the Model Grant, this workshop will provide users with understanding of both how the model grant of conservation easement works, and how it can work for your conservation organization.

Presenters

Pat Pregmon | Principal, Pregmon Law Offices

Pat has been practicing real estate law for over 35 years. Recognized both in Pennsylvania and nationally as a leading authority on conservation law, she serves on the Policy Advisory Committee of the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association and the Conservation Defense Advisory Committee of the Land Trust Alliance, the national association of land trusts in the United States. She is a prolific writer, having published many guides explaining the principles of conservation law and the ways it can be used to protect natural and scenic resources and preserve availability of land for public enjoyment. Most notably, Pat is the principal author of The Model Pennsylvania Conservation Easement and Commentary, a key publication of WeConservePA. The Model Conservation Easement and other model documents Pat has crafted have been adopted by land trusts throughout the United States.

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault, Esq. | Pregmon Law Offices

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault joined Pregmon Law Offices in 2000 after two years working as an associate in the real estate department at the Atlanta, Georgia-based law firm Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs.  A member of the Pennsylvania and Bucks County bar associations, Lauren also serves as a Trustee for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  A 1996 graduate of Kenyon College, Lauren earned her law degree from Wake Forest University.

3:00-4:00 | Methods for Gathering Stakeholder and Public Input for Conservation Planning

Over the course of three years, the Pennsylvania DCNR Bureau of Forestry has embarked on a multi-pronged effort to obtain input on its strategic planning process from staff, stakeholders, and the general public. They have utilized a mixed-method approach consisting of different survey methods, interview, and facilitation techniques to this end. Part of the work involved a collaboration with the Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg (CSR). Input processes have included public opinion polls, cognitive interviews, focus groups, online in-depth interviews, stakeholder surveys, and various meeting facilitation methods. A major effort has been participation in the 2019 and 2020 Lion Poll, which is a statistically valid sampling of adult Pennsylvanians. The Bureau used the Lion Poll to explore public opinion on the value of PA forests, threats to PA forests, value of Bureau services, and forest visitor and user experiences. Prior to the 2020 Lion Poll, the CSR team utilized cognitive interviewing, which is a method for testing the survey questions using an in-depth interviewing technique that explores the mental processes that respondents use to answer survey questions. The Lion Poll, as well as the other data collection techniques, will be explained with example results presented. This session is intended to give attendees ideas for how they might conduct enhanced staff, stakeholder, and public outreach efforts.

Presenters

Ryan Szuch | Section Chief of Forest Resource Planning, PA DCNR – Bureau of Forestry

In his role as Section Chief of Forest Resource Planning for the PA DCNR Bureau of Forestry, Ryan Szuch oversees long-range planning, policy development, land acquisitions, and sustainable forestry certification. Prior to his role in Planning, Ryan directed the water monitoring program of the Bureau’s Shale Gas Monitoring Team. He has worked as an Easement Monitoring Contractor for the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, and prior to that, Ryan worked for six years as an environmental consultant, focusing on natural resource permitting, environmental impact/damage assessment, ecosystem restoration, and ecological risks assessments. Ryan has a B.S. in Ecosystems Analysis, a Graduate Diploma in Natural Resources, and an M.S. in Soil Science. He was a 2001 Fulbright Scholar in Australia. Ryan resides in York County, with his wife, Ivy, and three dogs. In his spare time, he enjoys craft beer, hiking, and gardening.

Gerald Hoy | Forest Program Specialist, PA DCNR – Bureau of Forestry

Gerald Hoy is a Forest Resource Planner within DCNR Bureau of Forestry’s Planning Section. This section provides statewide leadership and direction with regard to strategic planning and guidance development. Hoy’s main areas of focus include Strategic Planning, Cultural Historic Resources, Natural Gas Monitoring, Social Input, Acquisitions, DEI, Wildfire, and Private Lands Forest Management. He has received a Governor’s Award for Excellence, two DCNR Secretary Awards and was selected as DCNR’s Service Forester of the Year.  Hoy is a graduate of Bald Eagle Area High School, Central PA Institute of Science & Technology – Environmental Science program and Penn College of Technology – Forestry Program. He began his forestry career with an urban tree care company as a Tree Health Care Specialist and is a PA Certified Arborist.  Before becoming a Forest Resource Planner, Hoy gained much experience from working in the William Penn, Loyalsock, and Bald Eagle State Forest’s and has been with the Bureau of Forestry since 2005.  Active in wildfire suppression, prescribed fire, and incident management teams, he has spent time working on wildfires and other natural disasters in Pennsylvania as well as several western states. He and his wife Melissa reside near Port Matilda, Centre County. They are very busy raising their 4 children. Hoy still finds time to hunt and recreate in Pennsylvania’s abundant State Forest and Game Lands.

Steph Wehnau | Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg

In her role as Director of the Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg, Steph Wehnau cultivates relationships with research partners in order to develop projects, writes and submits research proposals/grants, and manages a large project portfolio. She has lectured on survey research methods, questionnaire design, and cognitive interviewing. Steph is a member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and has received graduate training through the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, the nation’s oldest and largest program offering graduate training in the principles and practices of survey research. She holds a Master of Science in Administration of Justice from Shippensburg University as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree in Administration of Justice and minor in Political Science from The Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining the Center in 2003, Steph conducted research for the Sociology Department at Penn State and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention at the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency. In her spare time, Steph spends time with her family and enjoys traveling, reading, shopping at Target, and keeping up with the British royal family.

Nicole Sturges | Assistant Director, Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg

Nicole Sturges has been with the Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg since 2005 in a variety of roles. As Assistant Director, Nicole manages operations for multiple research projects, leads the qualitative research team, works with clients on study design and implementation, and oversees research compliance. She also serves as the Center’s primary focus group moderator, one-on-one interviewer, and lead qualitative data analyst. Nicole has lectured on focus group administration, survey interview techniques, and questionnaire design. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania and has received graduate training in survey questionnaire design and qualitative data analysis. Nicole is also a member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the Qualitative Public Opinion Research Group. Nicole resides in Lancaster County, with her husband and their two children. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with family and friends, reading, barre classes, exploring new trails with the family dog, and binge-watching Netflix.

Tim Servinsky | Project Manager, Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg

Tim Servinsky is a project manager at Penn State Harrisburg’s Center for Survey Research.  He holds a Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics from The Pennsylvania State University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Servinsky has extensive experience in web survey administration and other survey-related technologies.  In addition to his technology work, Mr. Servinsky leads a variety of research activities, including statistical analysis, research project design, and the Center’s omnibus Lion Poll.

3:00-4:30 | GIS Roundtable

Join fellow GIS staff to discuss current topics in conservation mapping and fieldwork. Roundtable
facilitators will try to collect topic ideas from participants prior to the roundtable, but the informal
session will be an opportunity for GIS users to “talk shop” with their colleagues.

Presenters

Megan Boatright | GIS Program Director, Natural Lands

Megan Boatright holds a Master of Arts in Geography from West Chester University and has been with Natural Lands Trust since 2007. Using GPS technology and Desktop GIS, she creates maps for conservation easements, land acquisitions, public visitation plans for Natural Lands’ preserves, and municipal planning. Recently, Megan has been working to provide Google Earth training to municipal officials and other conservation organizations in the region, and well as developing online mapping applications using ArcGIS Online and Google Maps. Her interest in conservation GIS began at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA, where she received her B.A. in 2000.

Rachel Ralls | Conservation Lands Program Manager, The Nature Conservancy Pennsylvania/Delaware

Rachel supports land protection efforts in Pennsylvania and Delaware with project tracking for all real estate transactions, and also coordinates legal monitoring requirements on TNC properties. She began her career at TNC as a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) intern in 2005. Her interest in spatial technology and data management began during her time at Millersville University where she graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Geography. She continued her education at Harrisburg Area Community College, and received a Certificate in Geospatial Technology. In 2013, she completed her Master’s Degree in GeoEnvironmental Studies at Shippensburg University.

Sue Costello | GIS Coordinator, Willistown Conservation Trust

Sue Costello has been the GIS Coordinator for Willistown Conservation Trust since 2004.  With geography degrees from both West Chester University and the University of Tennessee, her background includes experience in university teaching, environmental consulting and land protection. She has two grown children and lives in West Chester with her husband Joe.  In her spare time she enjoys MLS soccer games, finding new trails, and creating art from found objects.

3:00-4:30 | Essentials of Fundraising

Back to Basics. Focus on the Fundamentals. If it’s one thing that the 2020 pandemic has taught us, it’s that the fundamentals of raising money remain relevant, even as we struggle to distance, travel, and gather. But what are those “fundamentals?” In this introductory session, we’ll strip away all the jargon and assumptions and revisit the most basic tenets of fundraising. Along the way, we will examine – and dismantle – some of fundraising’s most persistent myths and fake news as well. And we’ll keep it light and fun – appropriate for staff and volunteers of all levels of experience, even the NOT inexperienced and terrified.

Presenter

David Allen | Principal, Development for Conservation

Development for Conservation assists conservation organizations raising money from individual donors by improving renewal, cultivation, and major gift systems. David Allen brings more than 30 years experience to the practice, including thirteen with The Nature Conservancy. He has devoted his professional career to helping conservation organizations and land trusts pursue excellence in all aspects of their conservation endeavors. David is a skilled seminar presenter, particularly in major gift fundraising. Specialties include development audits, board training, and campaigns. Working in collaboration with Consultant Nancy Moore, David also works on Strategic Planning, Organizational Needs Assessments, and Board Governance Training. Like his work in development consulting, David and Nancy work almost exclusively in the conservation space.

3:00-5:00 | Working Through Complications in Land Deals Experts Panel

Join Michael Knoop, Director of Special Projects for Land Conservation, Community Engagement, and Strategic Planning at Western Pennsylvania Conservancy for a moderated roundtable discussion on some of the hypothetical complications that can arise when working through land deals.

Presenters

Michael Knoop | Director of Special Projects for Land Conservation, Community Engagement, and Strategic Planning, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

Michael Knoop is Director of Special Projects for Land Conservation, Community Engagement, and Strategic Planning at Western Pennsylvania Conservancy and has worked at the Conservancy since 2005. Michael spends most of his time managing the Conservancy’s land conservation projects in central Pennsylvania and in Allegheny County. He also works on Community Gardens and Greenspaces Program projects and facilitates the Conservancy’s strategic planning.

Pat Pregmon | Principal, Pregmon Law Offices

Pat has been practicing real estate law for over 35 years. Recognized both in Pennsylvania and nationally as a leading authority on conservation law, she serves on the Policy Advisory Committee of the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association and the Conservation Defense Advisory Committee of the Land Trust Alliance, the national association of land trusts in the United States. She is a prolific writer, having published many guides explaining the principles of conservation law and the ways it can be used to protect natural and scenic resources and preserve availability of land for public enjoyment. Most notably, Pat is the principal author of The Model Pennsylvania Conservation Easement and Commentary, a key publication of WeConservePA. The Model Conservation Easement and other model documents Pat has crafted have been adopted by land trusts throughout the United States.

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault, Esq. | Pregmon Law Offices

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault joined Pregmon Law Offices in 2000 after two years working as an associate in the real estate department at the Atlanta, Georgia-based law firm Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs.  A member of the Pennsylvania and Bucks County bar associations, Lauren also serves as a Trustee for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  A 1996 graduate of Kenyon College, Lauren earned her law degree from Wake Forest University.

Jennifer Swogger | Environmental Scientist, Insite Group, Inc

Jennifer Swogger is an Environmental Scientist with Insite Group, Inc. Jennifer has been working in the environmental consulting field since 2002. Her project experience lies primarily with petroleum storage tank sites and Phase I Environmental Site Assessments. Jennifer holds a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science and Biology from Allegheny College.

Sara Giordano | Vice President and Senior Project Manager, Insite Group, Inc

Coordinator at Insite Group, Inc. Sara has been working in the environmental consulting field since 1995. She specializes in bioremediation and the application of new remedial technologies. In 2000, Sara cofounded Insite Group, Inc. with Paul Rogers. Sara holds a Bachelor’s degree in bacteriology from Washington State University, a Master’s degree in biological sciences from Youngstown State University, and a Doctorate degree in biomedical sciences (biochemistry and molecular biology) from Kent State University.

Paul Rogers | President and Senior Project Manager, Insite Group, Inc

Paul Rogers is President and Sr. Project Manager at Insite Group, Inc., and environmental consulting firm based in Sharon, PA. Paul has been working in the environmental consulting field since 1988 and has managed a wide variety of environmental projects. In 2000, Paul cofounded Insite Group, Inc. with Sara Giordano. Paul holds a Bachelor’s degree in geology from Kent State University.

Greg Snyder | Principal, Snyder Appraisal Associates

Greg is founder and president of Snyder Appraisal Associates. Raised on a family farm in Lehigh County, Greg graduated from PSU with a BS in Animal Industries and worked for Keystone Farm Credit for 14 years, first as a loan officer then as a staff appraiser. He is past president of the Northeast Chapter of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers and holds the designation of Accredited Rural Appraiser (ARA). At Snyder Appraisal Associates, Greg specializes in rural properties, and has the hands-on experience, education, and knowledge to be specialists in appraising rural and agricultural properties.  Our maxim says it best: “We understand the value of agriculture”

3:00-5:00 | Cultivating Meaningful Inclusion Through Community Engagement

Is your conservation organization interested in deepening its community engagement? Many organizations understand that efforts to gather feedback about conservation projects are necessary, yet community engagement for such projects is often used to affirm existing assumptions rather than an opportunity to gain new perspectives. As a result, workshops and surveys often barely scrape the surface of meaningful inclusion and engagement, resulting in feedback that is unintentionally biased and incomplete,,and perpetuating the exclusion of marginalized communities in the conservation and outdoor sphere. This workshop will detail the community engagement process undertaken by the Penn Trails Team for the Sarah B. Foulke Friendship Trails Master Plan, including the targeted community engagement process designed by consultants Karen Strong and Judy Anderson (respectively of Strong Outcomes and Community Consultants). This process sought to go beyond typical community engagement efforts to include input of non-traditional, or potential trail user communities, and to gather input for a trail system that would address issues of inclusion and access. Learn about the values that established the project design, the methods of listening more deeply, and how the feedback was integrated into trail designs and the final master plan. This workshop will also explore limitations and lessons learned to allow your land trust to explore what is appropriate for you.

Presenters

Sarah Walter | Planning & Design Manager, Penn Trails LLC

Prior to joining Penn Trails, Sarah worked in the Centre County Planning & Community Development Office for over 6 years as a Senior Planner, simultaneously administering the County Agricultural Land Preservation Program and serving as Executive Director for the Centre County Farmland Trust. She brings extensive public sector and land trust experience, and coordinated documentation and placement of conservation easements for the Centre County Agricultural Land Preservation Program while working with Federal, State, County, Municipal, and non-profit stakeholders.

Karen Strong | Strong Outcomes LLC

Karen Strong is the principal of Strong Outcomes, LLC, a consulting company that works with organizations that conserve land, wildlife, and water. She is deeply committed to science-based decision-making and evaluation yet believes that conservation will have limited success unless we can successfully work with people. Over the past 20 years, Karen has built capacity to conserve natural resources in dozens of communities and organizations and is always thinking about how we can make conservation more relevant to more people

Julie Anderson | Community Consultants LLC

Julie Anderson has worked in the land trust sector for over 25 years. Judy currently assists nonprofit organizations on practical strategic conservation initiatives, incorporating local communities, climate change, governance, communications, and community-based fundraising strategies.
She also coaches land trusts on inclusive conservation, easement drafting and stewardship, and building greater community relevance to ensure their work withstands the test of time. Judy is a regular presenter at national and regional land trust conferences and provides trainings on topics including fundraising/outreach, easement drafting/stewardship, climate change and land protection, and inclusive community conservation.

March 25, 2021

10:30-11:30 | Recreational Use of Land and Water Act Update

The Recreational Use of Land and Water Act (RULWA) offers immunity from personal injury lawsuits to landowners who allow their land to be used without charge for recreational purposes. After recent amendments, the courts have begun to construe the law more broadly to recognize immunities even when the land has some “development”on it, such as playgrounds. Some recent cases have dealt with government owned land which has its own immunity statute. WeConservePA has excellent resources in its Conservation Tools explaining the law, but many people don’t know it exists. Explaining that the law exists is sometimes necessary for both landowners and their advisors, like their attorneys or insurance agents, to feel comfortable allowing their land to be used for trails or outdoor events. At the same time, it’s unclear whether the law protects volunteers or park “friends” groups, and amendments have been proposed to add them. Understanding the law and recent cases “explaining” it will help us use the law better and to be more effective in advocating for changes.

Presenter

Kate Harper | Lawyer, Timoney Knox, LLP

Catherine M. (Kate) Harper, a partner at Timoney Knox since 1997, was also a member of the Pennsylvania General Assembly in the House of Representatives, representing eastern Montgomery County for eighteen years. Ms. Harper has a general litigation practice, but focuses on land use (particularly municipal, conservation and zoning law) and real estate in Southeastern Pennsylvania. She handles commercial litigation, contract disputes and employment law matters for entrepreneurs, families and small businesses. She has argued before the United States Supreme Court, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, all of the Pennsylvania appellate courts and the county courts in southeastern Pennsylvania. Kate represents local governments, zoning boards and land development applicants. She also represents land trusts, landowners and conservancies in preservation projects and drafting and enforcing of conservation easements.

10:30-11:30 | Floodplain Management 101 with Land Conservation Focus

Flooding is the #1 natural hazard to effect PA and one that is being amplified by the threat of climate change, specifically with increased rainfall and more severe storms. In this session, participants will gain a better understanding of how floodplain regulations apply to every municipality in Pennsylvania. This session will provide an overview on NFIP (National Flood Insurance Program), how to read FEMA flood maps, review the minimum State model ordinance regulations, and share examples of floodplain management in land conservation.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn the background to the NFIP and floodplain regulations
  • Explore the floodplain regulations for PA
  • Education on guides and resources related to floodplain development
  • Examples of floodplain management in land conservation

Presenter

Josh Lippert | Vice Chair PAFPM & Floodplain Manager, City of Philadelphia

Josh Lippert is the Floodplain Manager for City of Philadelphia and the chair of the City’s Flood Risk Management Task Force.  He also serves on the Pennsylvania Association of Floodplain Managers board as vice chair and education/outreach committee chair.  His background is in landscape architecture and environmental planning, with work in the private sector as well as with the City of Pittsburgh.

10:30-11:45 | Conservation Easements in Court: A Review of Easement Violation and Enforcement Litigation in Pennsylvania

This presentation is intended to share the recently published WeConservePA report entitled “Conservation Easements in Court: A review of easement violation and enforcement litigation in Pennsylvania.” The report reviews eleven Pennsylvania cases where the interpretation or enforcement of a conservation easement was at the center of litigation. It reveals that conservation easement holders and the conservation values they uphold prevail when a dispute leads to litigation. Judges respect the text of easement documents and their conservation purposes. In many cases, courts order the violator to pay the easement holder’s attorney fees and costs incurred in enforcing the easement. The presentation will include a detailed summary of the facts of each case, the court’s legal analysis, and where possible commentary from parties involved about how the litigation impacted the land trust’s operations as well as lessons learned.

Presenters

Ryan Hamilton | Land Conservation Manager, ClearWater Conservancy

As Land Conservation Manager for ClearWater Conservancy, Ryan works with local landowners, volunteers, partner agencies, engaged businesses and stakeholders along with ClearWater staff and board to conserve ecologically important habitats in Central Pennsylvania. Prior to joining ClearWater, Ryan practiced as an environmental, land use, and natural resources attorney in Pittsburgh providing modest means clients with access to environmental legal services. He holds a BA in Philosophy and English from Juniata College and a JD with a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law from Lewis and Clark Law School.

Jeffrey Swineheart | Chief Operating Officer, Lancaster Farmland Trust

Jeff is the chief operating officer of Lancaster Farmland Trust. In his 18-year tenure at Lancaster Farmland Trust, Swinehart has held several positions, most recently serving as deputy director since 2006. As COO, Swinehart assumes greater operational and management responsibilities, while continuing to work alongside the executive director. Jeff graduated with a master’s degree in public administration from Pennsylvania State University and has a B.S. in geography, plus minors in geology and regional planning from Mansfield University. Jeff is a member of the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association Policy Committee, serves as vice-chairman of the Manheim Township Planning Commission, and is a member of the executive committee of the Lancaster Clean Water Partners.

Erin McCormick | Director, Conservation Easement Program, Natural Lands

Erin is an attorney by training and her work with Natural Lands is centered on real estate transactions. She works to secure and shepherd land protection transactions, which often have many twists and turns that require her patience, perseverance, and good humor. Prior to joining Natural Lands, Erin clerked for the Earthrise Law Center (formerly Pacific Environmental Advocacy Center) in Portland, Oregon, one of the leading environmental law clinics in the country.

Steve Schiffman, Esq. | Schiffman, Sheridan and Brown, PC

Steven J. Schiffman concentrates his practice in the fields of business, taxation (including business and estate planning and administration), commercial loans, bank-asset recovery, and workout and nonprofit corporation law. He also provides counsel in the areas of general litigation, real estate and personal injury. Steve is a graduate with distinction of the Pennsylvania State University, where he received a B.S. degree in 1974. In 1977, he graduated from Capital University School of Law with a Juris Doctorate magna cum laude, followed by a master’s of law in taxation from Temple University of Law in 1983. After graduation from law school in 1977, Steve served as an assistant attorney general with the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue until 1980.

10:30-12:00 | Is it Time for a New Look? Things to Consider During a Rebranding

A Panel discussion still in development: Representatives from NPC, WeConservePA and other organizations in different phases of the rebranding process. Each panelist will bring their perspective based on their organizational experience. Each phase from RFP, selection, working with consultants & designers, roll-out and results will be touched upon. Target audience: organizations currently considering a re-brand, and those currently engaged in the process looking for guidance on what to expect and possible pitfalls to avoid.

Presenters

Holly Byers | Office and Communications Coordinator, Northcentral Pennsylvania Conservancy

Holly has been a part of Northcentral Pennsylvania Conservancy’s staff since March 2018.  As the Office & Communications Coordinator, Holly is responsible for the development, implementation, and analysis of NPC’s communications strategy across multiple media platforms.  Prior to relocating back to the Williamsport area and joining NPC, Holly served as the Outreach Director for Downeast Coastal Conservancy, a rural land trust located in coastal Maine .  She has her B.A. in Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing from Arcadia University.  When not out hiking or paddling with her husband and two toddlers, you can find Holly baking in the kitchen or on the field officiating PIAA soccer.   

Matt Byers | Principal, Byers Design

Matthew Byers is a graphic design consultant who partners with agencies and institutions to deliver impactful visuals that communicate, clarify, and compel. His client roster has included brands such as The Hershey Company and The University of Pennsylvania.

After earning a degree in Graphic Design from Pennsylvania College of Technology, Matthew established his career at the award-winning central PA advertising firm, JPL. Here he created logos, websites, and presentations for Fortune 500 companies. Since incorporating in 2015 Matthew has continued to leverage his experience to create integrated omni-channel design. He takes pride in understanding marketing goals before presenting well-crafted design solutions.

Matthew is a craftsman and explorer at heart. While not creative problem solving, you can find him building in the woodshop, trail running, and hiking and biking with his son.

Gail Farmer | Executive Director, Wissahickon Trails

Gail brings nearly 20 years of experience in the environmental nonprofit sector. When asked to summarize her role in a single word, she said “relationships.” She spends her time in partnership with staff, board, donors, and other community leaders to ensure that Wissahickon Trails is able to effectively fulfill its mission today, tomorrow, and for many years to come. Gail currently serves on the Montgomery County Planning Commission’s Open Space Board, Philadelphia Water’s
Green City, Clean Waters Steering Committee, the Water Quality Advisory Committee of the Delaware River Basin Commission, and is an advisor to the Wissahickon Clean Water Partnership. She is a Senior Fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program and a Community Scholars Fellow of the University of Pennsylvania. In 2018, she received PennFuture’s Woman of Community Engagement and Environmental Education Leadership Award. Gail earned her M.Sc. in Ecology from S.U.N.Y ESF in Syracuse.

Andy Loza | Executive Director, WeConservePA

Andy Loza has served since 2000 as executive director of WeConservePA where he leads public policy efforts, develops technical guidance, and plans and implements technical assistance and education programs. His initiatives include development of WeConservePA’s model legal documents and guides. His work is informed by seven years as a land trust executive director and leading land use and environmental planning, conservation, economic development, and trail initiatives for county government. He holds degrees from the University of Pittsburgh and Lehigh University.

Kim Murphy | Executive Director, Berks Nature

Kim joined Berks Nature staff in January 2004 and became president in July that same year. Prior to coming to Berks Nature, Kim was director of development at Penn State for nearly 12 years. During her time at Penn State she managed the development , alumni, and university relations program for both the Berks Campus in Reading and the Lehigh Valley Campus in Fogelsville. While at Penn State, Kim raised over $17 million for the Berks campus and Berks–Lehigh Valley College added 39 new endowed funds, managed a successful capital campaign raising $4.7 million, and has executed a variety of special events and worked with many volunteers. Kim has served on the board of several charitable organizations in the community including: Beacon House, The American Red Cross–Berks County Chapter, and The Girl Scouts– Great Valley Council. Kim does numerous trainings throughout the community and enjoys sharing her experience in development and nonprofit administration with others.

Kirsten Warner | Senior Director of Communications, Natural Lands

As Director of Communications, Kirsten works to share Natural Lands’ mission, success stories, and much more with the community and the media. In addition to writing our magazine, brochures, and interpretive signs, Kirsten is responsible for the organization’s website and social media presence. Prior to working for Natural Lands, she spent several years at Tyler Arboretum and Mt. Cuba Center, respectively. Her first job was selling cars (minus the plaid pants). “I’m proud of myself for making the leap from the corporate world to the non-profit one. It was scary at the time, but I wouldn’t go back for the world.” Kirsten received B.A.s in English and Psychology from Bucknell University.

10:30-12:00 | DEI Community of Practice

DEI has been a focus for land trusts and conservation agencies for several years. Although that work has started to improve gender parity within organizations, disparities in representation, visitation, funding, and sense of belonging persist – especially among BIPOC. The events of 2020 brought outdoor space inequity and racial justice to the forefront and many organizations are struggling to reconcile our histories and create spaces for everyone. This session will provide a sounding board for agencies and organizations who have already taken steps to improve diversity, equity, & inclusion. A facilitated discussion will allow a safe place for discussion of what has worked, what has failed, and the opportunity to learn from one another as a community of practice. After the session, participants will walk away with renewed enthusiasm for DEI work, new ideas, learning resources, and a network of supportive conservationists who share the passion for DEI.

Presenters

Emily Hendrickson | DEI Coordinator, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Emily is DCNR’s first Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Coordinator. Previously, she was a William Penn Fellow at DCNR focused on DEI and outdoor recreation planning. Emily’s professional interests involve environmental justice through community and environmental health. She holds a Master’s in public health, a Master’s in social work, and has experience as an education and interpretive park ranger.

Lauren Imgrund | Secretary for Conservation and Technical Services, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Lauren Imgrund was appointed DCNR’s Deputy Secretary for Conservation and Technical Services on August 1, 2016. Lauren has over twenty-five years’ experience in building collaborative partnerships to develop place-based solutions and strategies for land conservation, outdoor recreation, community re-vitalization, water quality improvement and natural resource conservation. Lauren’s previous positions at DCNR included serving as the Conservation Landscape Coordinator, and as a Recreation and Parks Advisor; prior to coming to DCNR she was the Director of the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring at Dickinson College for ten years; and, served as Assistant Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Wildlife Federation. Lauren holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Juniata College and a Master of Arts in Community Psychology from Pennsylvania State University.

Amanda Penn | Forest Resource Planner, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Forestry

Sara Painter | Director of Outreach and Development, We ConservePA

Sara joined WeConservePA’s staff in May 2019. Her roles include outreach to Pennsylvania conservation organizations, developing community partnerships, managing donor relations, and grant writing. She is a senior fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program and a leader for The Climate Reality Project. She graduated from West Chester University and studied writing at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining WeConservePA, Sara served as director of marketing and development for French & Pickering Creeks Conservation Trust, where she led fundraising activities for land conservation in northern Chester County. Sara has also worked for the Los Angeles Stage Alliance and The Colony Theatre Company in Burbank, California.

Kip Le Warn | Engagement Coordinator, Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed

Kip Le Warn joined the Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed in 2019, serving as the Engagement Coordinator. In their role they facilitate the Coalition’s Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice workgroup, as well as plan major events such as the Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum. Beforehand, Kip served with the Americorps N.J. Watershed Ambassadors Program as the Ambassador for the Saddle River and Lower Passaic River Watersheds and worked in the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission’s Engineering Department. Kip earned a Bachelor of Science from Rutgers University New Brunswick in Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, along with a minor in Environmental Geomatics, focusing on urban coastal toxicology and resiliency in their undergraduate thesis.

1:00-2:00 | Utility Scale Solar Development in PA - What are the Implications on Conserved Land, Present and Future

As energy transitions continue to expand nationally and in the Commonwealth, utility scale solar is being seen as becoming one of the key energy sources of our future. While solar currently makes up only 1-2 percent of total power generation in Pennsylvania, it is projected to have rapidly expanded by 2030 to impact over 80,000 acres of land in the state. Much of the solar footprint currently being leased is on agricultural or forested land. Questions are arising around whether or not conserved land can be leased for utility solar, what impact this type of leasing could have on farmland preservation in the near term, and how can local communities plan for large scale solar arrays in their jurisdiction. As part of this session, the presenters will take the participants on an immersive virtual “tour” to gain a birds-eye view of several utility scale projects in PA, offering a better understanding of the implications and impacts.

Presenters

Thomas Murphy | Director, Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research

Tom has 35 years of experience working with public officials, researchers, industry, government agencies, and landowners during his tenure with the Outreach branch of the University. His current work is centered on educational consultation in energy transitions, specifically at the convergence of shale gas and renewables, with a more recent emphasis on landscape scale solar. In his role with MCOR, Tom provides leadership to a range of Penn State’s related energy outreach events and research activities.

Brook Duer | Staff Attorney, Penn State Law

Brook Duer joined the Center for Agricultural and Shale Law at Penn State, after serving at several levels of legal Counsel with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) for eleven years. Prior to that, Brook was engaged in private practice serving clients in Southcentral Pennsylvania for seventeen years. His private practice concentrated in civil litigation, as well as, representing farmers, and all types of clients, engaged in agriculture and related businesses. Brook received his law degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

1:00-2:00 | Tools and Tactics to Help Your Team Focus Less on Tasks and Start Focusing on Results

Improve your storytelling and fundraising and increase board and staff engagement by shifting your lens from projects and tasks, to outcomes and results. Gail will share the Objectives and Key Results (OKR) process for converting your strategic plan into a results-oriented and iterative work plan for your team. Gail and her team at Wissahickon Trails have tested and revised this strategic implementation process so that it clearly aligns on-the-ground work with strategy, improves cross-departmental communications, and focuses all levels of the organization on measuring results towards the achievement of shared goals and objectives. This process will make it easier to tell the story of your organization’s impacts and improve your communications and fundraising.

Presenter

Gail Farmer | Executive Director, Wissahickon Trails

Gail brings nearly 20 years of experience in the environmental nonprofit sector. When asked to summarize her role in a single word, she said “relationships.” She spends her time in partnership with staff, board, donors, and other community leaders to ensure that Wissahickon Trails is able to effectively fulfill its mission today, tomorrow, and for many years to come. Gail currently serves on the Montgomery County Planning Commission’s Open Space Board, Philadelphia Water’s
Green City, Clean Waters Steering Committee, the Water Quality Advisory Committee of the Delaware River Basin Commission, and is an advisor to the Wissahickon Clean Water Partnership. She is a Senior Fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program and a Community Scholars Fellow of the University of Pennsylvania. In 2018, she received PennFuture’s Woman of Community Engagement and Environmental Education Leadership Award. Gail earned her M.Sc. in Ecology from S.U.N.Y ESF in Syracuse.

1:00-2:00 | Communicating with New Audiences

The COVID-19 pandemic brought thousands of new visitors to public lands. Many of these visitors have little prior experience with outdoor recreation. Connecting with these visitors is crucial both to grow our conservation audience and to minimize damage to parks and preserves. This session will give you practical communication tips, tools, and strategies to connect with new audiences. The session will explore multiple communications tools including website content, interpretive signs, social media, videos, and graphic design. Learn how to make all your content simpler to understand, easier to access, and more inclusive for diverse audiences.

Presenter

Josh Van Brakle | Recreation and Conservation Advisor 2, PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Josh VanBrakle is a recreation and conservation advisor at the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. He manages communications for the Bureau of Recreation and Conservation including the development of e-newsletters, social media posts, infographics, and videos. Josh previously served as GIS specialist at the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association (now WeConservePA). He also worked as a research forester in the New York City Watershed, where he edited the landowner outreach website MyWoodlot.com.

1:00-2:00 | Comparing the Riparian Buffer Funding Programs

Planting riparian buffers is a “hot” BMP and there’s funding for implementation. Learn about the programs that can provide funding for planting buffers. Some programs award funds for re-granting while others work directly with landowners (including, possibly land trusts) to get trees along streams. Representatives from the Natural Resource Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency, PA Bureaur of Forestry, and Chesapeake Bay Foundation (and possibly PA DEP) will explain their funding opportunities and how land trusts can get involved.

Presenters

Renee’ Carey | Executive Director, Northcentral Pennsylvania Conservancy

Reneé has been with the Northcentral Pennsylvania Conservancy since 1994, becoming Executive Director in 1998. She is past President of the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association, and still serves on the organization’s policy committee, DEIJ work group, and conference committee.  Additionally, Renee’ sits on the Center for Private Forests at Penn State Board and serves on the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Forest Stewardship Committee.

Teddi Stark | Riparian Forest Buffer and Watershed Forestry Program Manager, DCNR Bureau of Forestry

Teddi Stark is the Riparian Forest Buffer and Watershed Forestry Program manager with the DCNR Bureau of Forestry. Teddi helps to develop strategies and options for reaching daunting riparian forest buffer implementation goals and other forestry-related goals for watershed improvement. She gets to work with a wonderful team of humans who help develop ideas into reality and grow seedlings into forests. Prior to her work with DCNR, Teddi worked as a watershed specialist with Juniata County Conservation District for several years, and got her start in the world of watersheds through getting her feet wet (literally and figuratively) serving as an AmeriCorps volunteer with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Teddi lives in Harrisburg with her husband and two dogs, with whom she likes to kayak, hike and garden… just like every other conservation professional.

James Gillis | State Biologist, Natural Resource Conservation Service

As the PA State Biologist for the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Jim helps manage the Farm Bill programs associated with wildlife, endangered species, wetlands, and habitat conservation on private lands. Jim has been involved with riparian forest buffer planning, funding, implementation, and maintenance for nearly 20 years.

Rebecca Csutoras | Farm Program Chief, Pennsylvania State Farm Service Agency Office

Rebecca Csutoras is Agricultural Program Chief for the Pennsylvania Farm Service Agency (FSA). In this role, Becca, along with a team of Program Specialists, is responsible for the administration of many programs throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania including the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP); disaster assistance programs including Livestock Indemnity (LIP) and Tree Assistance Program (TAP); MPP-Dairy; Marketing Assistance Loans and LDPs; Farm Storage Facility Loans; Conservation Programs; and other price support, production, and disaster related programs. From 2016-2018, Becca was an Agricultural Program Specialist in the FSA National Office in Washington DC. Becca was raised on a family farm in Southeastern Virginia. She earned a BS in Crop and Soil Environmental Science, and a MS in Vocational and Technical Education from Virginia Tech.

Brenda Lee Sieglitz | Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership Manager, Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Brenda Lee Sieglitz is the Senior Manager of the Keystone 10 Million Trees Partnership. Based in Harrisburg, she leads the collaborative effort, coordinated by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, of over 150 national, regional, state and local agencies, as well as conservation organizations, watershed groups, conservancies, outdoors enthusiasts, businesses and individuals willing to plant trees. Brenda holds a degree in business her background is in business and project management in the private sector. She is an award-winning author, PA Master Naturalist, and has held leadership and mentorship roles with the Susquehanna Valley Chamber of Commerce, Lancaster Chamber, Team Sarcoma: Keepin’ it Kevin, and Lancaster Against Pipelines, and has volunteered with National Park Service, Lancaster Conservancy, and Hospice & Community Care. She lives in Mount Joy, PA with her husband Dave and their rescue beagle Fina. You can often find them camping in their little Scamp trailer or turning their quarter acre into a forest. She has a grown step-daughter Jade and son-in-law Nick who live “right down the street”.

1:00-2:30 | The Model Grant of Conservation Easement: How it Works, and Can Work for You - Part 2

Join Pat Pregmon and Lauren Pregmon-Tetreault of Pregmon Law Offices for this 2-part workshop breaking down the Model Grant of Conservation Easement and Declaration of Covenants. A comprehensive look at the Model Grant, this workshop will provide users with understanding of both how the model grant of conservation easement works, and how it can work for your conservation organization.

Presenters

Pat Pregmon | Principal, Pregmon Law Offices

Pat has been practicing real estate law for over 35 years. Recognized both in Pennsylvania and nationally as a leading authority on conservation law, she serves on the Policy Advisory Committee of the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association and the Conservation Defense Advisory Committee of the Land Trust Alliance, the national association of land trusts in the United States. She is a prolific writer, having published many guides explaining the principles of conservation law and the ways it can be used to protect natural and scenic resources and preserve availability of land for public enjoyment. Most notably, Pat is the principal author of The Model Pennsylvania Conservation Easement and Commentary, a key publication of WeConservePA. The Model Conservation Easement and other model documents Pat has crafted have been adopted by land trusts throughout the United States.

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault, Esq. | Pregmon Law Offices

Lauren Pregmon Tetreault joined Pregmon Law Offices in 2000 after two years working as an associate in the real estate department at the Atlanta, Georgia-based law firm Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs.  A member of the Pennsylvania and Bucks County bar associations, Lauren also serves as a Trustee for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  A 1996 graduate of Kenyon College, Lauren earned her law degree from Wake Forest University.